Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions
Read Online
Share

Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions an assessment of expectable kinds of future eruptions and their possible effects on human lives and property based on Mount Hood"s eruptive behavior during the last 15,000 years by Dwight Raymond Crandell

  • 866 Want to read
  • ·
  • 48 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. : for sale by the Supt. of Docs., GPO in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Hood, Mount, Or.

Subjects:

  • Volcanic activity prediction.,
  • Hood, Mount, Or.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Dwight R. Crandell.
SeriesGeological Survey bulletin ; 1492, Geological Survey bulletin ;, 1492.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE75 .B9 no. 1492, QE523.H66 .B9 no. 1492
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 81 p. :
Number of Pages81
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4418123M
LC Control Number79022249

Download Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Get this from a library! Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions: an assessment of expectable kinds of future eruptions and their possible effects on human lives and property based on Mount Hood's eruptive behavior during the l years. [Dwight R Crandell; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Mount Hood is more than , years old. The volcano has grown in fits and starts, with decades to centuries of frequent eruptions separated by quiet periods lasting from centuries to more t years. In the recent past, Mount Hood has had two significant eruptive periods, one about 1, years ago and the other about years ago. The Old Maid eruptive period lasted for a decade or more following a dormant period of more than 1, years. It is the youngest major eruptive period at Mount Hood. Pyroclastic flows and lahars were generated by repeated collapse of a lava dome extruded near the site of present-day Crater Rock, which is the surviving remnant of that dome. Additional information about Mount Hood is presented on the Cascade Volcano Observatory homepage of the U.S. Geological Survey. Sources of Information: Crandell, D.R., , Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin , 81 p.

Mount Hood (N, W) is the tallest mountain in Oregon (11, feet, 3, m) and popular with skiers, hikers, and climbers. It is 45 miles (75 km) east-southeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount Hood is a stratovolcano made of lava flows, domes, and volcaniclastic deposits. Most of the volcano is andesite composition. Mount Hood is a potentially active stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic was formed by a subduction zone on the Pacific coast and rests in the Pacific Northwest region of the United is located about 50 miles (80 km) east-southeast of Portland, on the border between Clackamas and Hood River counties. In addition to being Oregon's highest mountain, it is one Elevation: 11, ft (3, m)  NAVD Mount Hood is an active volcano close to rapidly growing communities, recreation areas, and major transportation routes and therefore imposes heightened risk. Potential hazards include collapse of growing lava domes and generation of pyroclastic flows, which in turn melt snow and ice to form lahars that flow far down valleys; the long-term. A long-term volcano hazard assessment report is a publication that summarizes the types and likelihood of future hazardous phenomena expected to occur at a specific volcano or volcanic region. The report typically includes a summary of the specific hazards, their impact areas, and a map showing ground-hazard zones. The assessments are also critical for planning long-term.

Potential hazards from future eruptions of Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington. Mount St. Helens has had a long history of spasmodic explosive activity, and we believe it to be an especially dangerous volcano because of its past behavior and the relative'y high has in the recent geologic past, and these future eruptions will affect Cited by:   A new study has found that a mixing of two different types of magma is the key to the historic eruptions of Mount Hood, Oregon's tallest mountain, and that eruptions often happen in . An essay or paper on Effect of Mt. Hood Eruption on Atmosphere. Analysis: Effect of Mt. Hood Eruption on Atmosphere Each of three major eruptive periods at Mount Hood (12, 15,), 1,,, and years ago) produced dacite domes, pyroclastic flows, and mudflows, but virtually no pumic. Mount Hood Coordination Plan June Final 2 Mount Hood volcano is close to small but rapidly growing communities and recreation areas, and is within 70 miles of metropolitan Portland, Oregon. It has erupted intermittently for hundreds of thousands of years²its most recent File Size: KB.